Posts Tagged ‘spikes’

DIY Pearl and Chain Spike Choker (and How to Finish a Necklace with Crimp Beads)

0.diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-introphoto Sometimes you’re feeling a little ladylike…and a little edgy at the same time. This pearl and chain choker pairs so well with both demure outfits and darker streetwear easily. All you need is aluminum chain, glass beads, jumprings, and a closure. diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-done1And of course some hematite spike beads for that necessary wild child. Here’s how to make your own with some affordable supplies from PandaHall: (and a brush up on How to Use Crimp Beads, below)

You Need:diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-materials

aluminum twisted curb chain (5 mm wide)  //  silver color aluminum twisted curb chain (5 mm wide)  //  6mm white glass imitation pearl beads  //  non-magnetic hematite rectangle beads  /  matching jumprings (6 medium, can all be the same size)  //  2 crimp beads  //  2 (two) 3-strand necklace ends  //  Beadalon nylon stringing cord  //  chain cutting pliers  //  crimp pliers  //  jump ring tool (or another set of pliers)

How To:diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-step1

1. Attach one end of the chain to one of the necklace ends with a jumpring.

2. Hold the flat curb chain against your neck and decide how long you want it (mine was 14″). Use the chain cutting pliers to cut it at that point.

3. Attach that end to the other necklace end, being careful to keep the chain flat.

4. Attach the next oval link chain in the same way, making a little longer than the first so it will drape lower and lay flat.

How to Finish a Necklace Using Crimp Beadsdiy-pearl-and-chain-choker-step2

5. Crimp beads are an easy, clean way to finish a cord necklace, and they look really great. Thread one crimp bead onto the end of your Beadalon cord, leaving about 1″.

6. Thread a jumpring onto the end.

7. Curve the cord around the jumpring and back into the crimp bead. Make sure the loop around the jump ring is small.

8. Use crimping pliers to first smash the crimp bead flat (in the grooves closest to the plier center), then bend the flattened ends towards each other (in the hole closest to the plier tips). You’ll make the crimp bead into a flattened hot dog shape.

diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-step3

Voila!diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-step4

9. Attach the jumpring onto the final loop of the necklace clasp, below the chains.

10. Estimate how long you need and cut the wire a little longer than the length of the longest chain.

11. Start threadiing pearls onto the wire. Use the first pearl/s to hide the end of the wire.

12. When you are close to where the center of the wire would be, start adding hematite spike beads.diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-step5

13. Add a spike bead, a pearl, and another spike bead in a graduated manner.

14. Continue adding pearls once the center spikes are finished. Once your strand of pearls is as long as you want it (slightly longer than the bottom chain so it hangs below it), add a crimp bead.

15. Be careful to hold the crimp bead close to the last pearl, and finish the end of the wire as before. Tuck the long end into the last pearl bead/s.

16. Use a jumpring to attach to the remaining open loop in the necklace closure.

diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-done1

And that’s it! diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-done3

It’s a little fiddly and something you’ll want to do while watching your fave TV show to pass the time…but once done this 3-strand sophisticated choker has maximum impact.

You can make your own just by checking out PandaHall.com for the best beading supplies!diy-pearl-and-chain-choker-done2

Happy DIY’ing!

xo

Carly

FTC Disclosure: Pandall.com provided me with the craft supplies featured in this post for me to make a fun DIY with. I have received no other compensation. The opinions above are my own. For my full Disclosure Policy, click here.

DIY Spike-End Bangles: 3 Ways

0.diyspikeendbangle_introLately double-ended spike bangles are trending all over Pinterest and street-style photos: stacked with DIY friendship bracelets, pretty watches, stretchy beaded bracelets, and other metal bangles.  You could spend hundreds of dollars on even just one at Sarah Chloe or CC Skye, for example. But they’re super-easy to DIY, and the results are amazing!  Try your hand at making your own with 3 different versions in these tutorials: (more…)

Like a Hedgehog…

Are you kidding me???!

The Sam Edelman Lorissa pump, exclusively for Solestruck, available here.

First person to DIY this gets crowned spike DIY Queen for the millenium.

What do we think? Coveting badly?  Or soooooo over the spike trend it’s not even funny?

xoxox

Carly

~If you liked this post, please share it!~

Don’t Buy – D.I.Y! Givenchy Spiked Headband

Of course, now that I’ve written this all up I see that Style Hurricane has posted her own tutorial, featured in Foam Magazine.  Well gosh darn golly gee now I feel silly.  In any case, here’s the tutorial I’ve been working on (completely independently – really!!)…

Inspired by a Givenchy piece above (featured on Who What Wear awhile back), I made my own spiked headband.  (I’m not paying $500 for the Givenchy one, at any rate!  This project will cost you, at the most, $12 if you don’t already have the spikes.)

You Need: (more…)

Don’t Buy, DIY: Jennifer Behr Spiked Turban

$498 for a piece of fabric with some spikes on it???  Wow.

Jennifer Behr’s couture headbands have been featured in countless magazines (including Vogue) and TV (on Gossip Girl, for instance).  Beautiful and distinctive, they are a favorite of brides and Hollywood starlets.  They’re hand-made in New York City.

And they’re very, VERY expensive.  Take the turban above, for instance.

It’s silk with patent leather and stainless steel spikes, and $498.  Come on.

Obviously I’m in a bad mood this morning, noshing on Cheese Straws. Note to self: DO NOT EVER BUY CHEESE STRAWS AGAIN.

Cheese straws: the work of the Devil.

But back to this “turban” headband.

Lately turbans are experiencing a revival: evidenced in part by Forever21 offering up a turban last month on their site – no, not towel wrap for drying your hair, folks…a real, live turban – as fashion accessory.  Plus the girls at BleachBlack blogged about wanting one awhile back (I’m just too stuffed with cheese straws lazy to find the link).  Eek.

Friendly reader Kay sent me the photo above saying that the Jennifer Behr piece reminded her of my DIY’s.  I do like me them studs, heh heh!

So, here’s the DIY if you’re curious…

You Need:
*20-pc bag of 1/2″ cone spikes ($5.59, Studsandspikes.com)
*100-pc bag of 3/8″ cone studs ($2.89, Studsandspikes.com)
*strip of stretchy black fabric (I used a Lycra swimsuit fabric)

Tools: fabric scissors / matching thread / sewing machine / hand-sewing needle / pliers / awl / Phillips screwdriver

How To:
1. Cut a piece of fabric long enough to go around your head and then some. Mine was about 8″ wide and a yard long.2. Fold cut piece in half horizontally, right sides together, and stitch along long edge.3. Turn piece right side out and you now have a long tube.4. Wrap the tube around your head and pin at the correct length. (I made a single twist in the fabric at the front center.) Make sure the tension is correct – you need it a little looser than what you would think is a good tightness for a headband/wrap, lest you get a headache after wearing it all day.5. Sew ends of wrap together (right sides together). (not pictured) Then fold seam allowance to inside of wrap, cut excess. This will give you a clean seam on the outside of your wrap. Sew one more time vertically down that seam allowance to secure it down. (not pictured)

—>If you just want a plain twisted-front turban like the Olsen twins below…you’re done!  If you want to spike it and stud it like Jennifer Behr’s piece, keep reading…Tutorial continued…

6. Try on head-wrap; bunch it up in a couple places and pin.7. Hand-tack the bunched-up areas so the piece has a “gathered” look to it.8. Now we stud! I slipped the turban over my leg and sat it on my knee for stability. I pushed the prongs of the cone studs into the fabric, and folded them over on the underside of the fabric using pliers.9. Then use an awl to pierce the holes for the cone spikes, which have a thick screw that needs to pass through the fabric. (The easiest way to do this is to poke the hole thru from the right side – then thread the spike screw in from the wrong side, following the awl as you pull it out.) Then attach the cone spike tops, and use a screwdriver to secure from the underside. (not pictured)

As you can see above, it turned out kind of like a wide headband!

You’re done! I didn’t add quite as many spikes ‘n’ studs as the Jennifer Behr version – simply because I got tired of it. I actually made a second layer to the piece so the center twist wouldn’t be so narrow and I could stud and spike through the upper layer only. This ensured no scratchy stud prongs would be directly against my forehead, but it turned out that the inner layer was a no-go since the spikes wouldn’t sit properly when there was fabric sitting underneath them. If you do choose to add another piece of fabric inside the headwrap (making it shorter than the headwrap and stitching its edges to the headwrap edges so it’s like a little stitched-down flap inside); I’d recommend studding the cone studs in the upper layer of fabric, but setting the spikes through both layers so they sit right. I know that sounds confusing!

The fabric’s stretch is a bit of a problem – some spikes may fall out if you pull the piece too much, so this requires care when handling.  FRA-GEE-LEH as they say in Italian!  (Okay, I guess I’ve seen A Christmas Story way too many times…;-)

What do we think? Does this work? Is this a no-go? Do I look like I am about to join a biker gang?

If you need further proof that studded headbands are all that this season, this Givenchy studded headband was featured in WhoWhatWear’s December holiday gift guide. Loving the chain gloves too!

But I’m a little wary of the studs-around-the-head look…they remind me of something quite Biblical.  Ah, who’m I kidding??  It’ll be my next DIY, guarantee ya.  (DIY available here.)

Happy DIY’ing!
xoxox
Carly

Don’t Buy, DIY: Christian Louboutin for Rodarte Super-Spiked Heels


This was a lo-o–ooooong time in coming. Hope you guys didn’t get bored waiting!:-)

The highly, highly coveted Christian Louboutin for Rodarte spike heels – only sold for a short time at Christian Louboutin boutiques in Fall of ’08, never showing up at Net-a-Porter, not ever appearing on eBay. Victoria Beckham even stepped out in the gorgeous gold ones below. But how to get a pair for oneself?

Source: StyleFrizz.com

The RedSole version.

Of course, you could always fork over $188 for the black knockoffs over at RedSole (or here for the gold ones, pictured above). They’ve changed that texturized (Swarovski-encrusted?) area on the toe to snakeskin, and the heel isn’t as high or as skinny, but it’s a fairly good knockoff…if you want to pay $188.

(source: Fashion Mongers)
You could always DIY your own following the instructions at Fashion Mongers here for a similar style also in the Rodarte line.
But I wanted the exact same style as the shoes above on the right, butin black- and I haven’t found any DIY tutes out there on the Internet yet (correct me if I’m wrong!:-) So here ya go – step by step!

I have to break the process into multiple steps, since this is quite long though not excessively complicated. So, in 4 Parts:

To DIY Your Own Pair of Rodarte Spiked Heels You Will Need: (after the jump)

(more…)